Course Descriptions

BLW 289 - Topics in Business Law (1-3 hours)
Conceptual treatment of topics related to business law. 1-3 hours, may be repeated up to 6 hours under different titles/topics. Prerequisite: Stated in the current Schedule of Classes.

BLW 342 - Legal Environment of Business (3 hours)
Introduction to the fundamentals of law as it relates to business including the social, equitable, and ethical concerns. The influence of the government regulation of business including procedure, managing disputes, constitutional law, contracts, torts, international business, business organizations, labor, agency, environmental concerns, and consumer law. Emphasis on analytical legal reasoning and the case method. Prerequisite: junior standing

BLW 345 - Law of Business (3 hours)
Principles of the law of contracts, sales and the commercial code, commercial paper, agency, business organizations, and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: BLW 342

BLW 347 - Law and the Entrepreneur (3 hours)
Introduces students to legal requirements of forming a business and how to anticipate legal concerns and risks during the life of the business. Covers legal issues, such as intellectual property, contracts, entity formation, and venture capital funding. Prerequisite: junior standing

BLW 355 - Labor-Management Relations (3 hours)
Collective bargaining as a social innovation in labor-management relations. Current public policy, major substantive issues in management and union policies, and tactics in collective bargaining and dispute settlement. Case studies. Prerequisite: Junior standing; M L 350 or consent of ETL department chair

BLW 389 - Topics in Business Law (1-3 hours)
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time the course is offered. Topic and prerequisite stated in current schedule of classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Stated in current Schedule of Classes.

BLW 395 - Real Estate Law (3 hours)
Basic principles of real estate law and practices including extent of real estate interests, present and future interests and non-possessory interests, fixtures, liens, legal descriptions, co-ownership, landlord-tenant, brokerage, contracts, financing, mortgages, deeds, closing, transfer of real estate after death, and tax aspects. Prerequisite: junior standing

BLW 446 - Employment Law (3 hours)
Legal issues surrounding employment, including the employment relationship, equal opportunity laws, discrimination, personnel handbooks, testing, workers' compensation, federal wage and hour law, OSHA, ERISA, and federal labor law. Prerequisite: BLW 342

BLW 499 - Independent Studies in Business Law (1-3 hours)
Studies undertaken by academically qualified students under the guidance of a faculty member, with the approval of the chair of the Department of Entrepreneurship, Technology, and Law. Repeatable to 6 s.h. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

BLW 542 - Legal Environment of Business (2 hours)
Analysis of the legal environment in which business operates emphasizing the ethical and equitable influence on legal development. Study of specific areas of procedure, constitutional law, contracts, torts, international business law, business organizations, and the regulatory environment related to labor, environmental, and consumer law. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA elective or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: Consent of director of graduate programs

BMA 354 - Organizational Analysis (3 hours)
Methods used to analyze internal operations of organizations. Systematic techniques for gathering and analyzing data necessary to assess organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

BMA 620 - Management Theory (3 hours)
Planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling operations through managerial decision making. Emerging issues and trends; integration of principles and concepts with contemporary concerns. Prerequisite: QM 263 or QM 502.

ENT 280 - Entrepreneurial Creativity (3 hours)
Toolkit to think more innovatively. Students will gain knowledge of various theories of creativity and innovation and will learn how to rebuild cognitive models. By the end of the semester, students will develop at least one marketable business opportunity.

ENT 281 - The Entrepreneurial Career (1 hour)
This course is designed to give students a feel for an entrepreneurial career. The course will consist of entrepreneurs and investors as guest speakers, case studies, and opportunity recognition theory and activities. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the benefits and risks of being an entrepreneur and how entrepreneurs recognize opportunities

ENT 289 - Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-3 hours)
Conceptual treatment of topics important to entrepreneurship. Topics stated in current Schedule of Classes. 1-3 hours, may be repeated up to 6 hours under different titles/topics Prerequisite: Stated in current Schedule of Classes.

ENT 381 - Entrepreneurship for Non-Business Students (3 hours)
This course is designed for students throughout the Bradley campus, except for those majoring in business. Whether your major is the arts, engineering, education, or science, the focus will be on how to launch a new venture enterprise. Students may have a serious interest in starting a business or only want to explore the world of entrepreneurship. The course will answer the question,"Would creating my own enterprise be for me?" Subjects include finding an opportunity, determining if there would be satisfied customers, the use of a business plan, obtaining financing/resources, and deciding on the next steps to take. Students will develop an idea for starting a new venture. Prerequisite: Junior Standing, Not open to Business Majors, Cannot earn credit if taken ENT 382.

ENT 382 - Entrepreneurship Startups (3 hours)
Activities involved in starting, financing, growing, and harvesting a new business venture. Entrepreneurs and their behavior, analysis of opportunities, obtaining capital, and venture strategies. Prerequisite: ATG 157; 42 credit hours and a declared entrepreneurship first major or junior standing for other majors.

ENT 383 - Managing Entrepreneurial Growth (3 hours)
Students will gain a better understanding of the challenges of growing an entrepreneurial business. The course will focus on adapting growth strategies, marketing, cash management and personnel in changing competitive environments. Prerequisite: M L 350 and junior standing.

ENT 384 - Entrepreneurial Finance (3 hours)
Planning and strategies involved in starting or expanding a business. Emphasis on capitalization, record keeping, liquidity management, fixed asset management, financial analysis, expansion strategies, establishing firm value, and exiting the firm. Cross-listed with FIN 384. Prerequisite: ENT 382 or FIN 322.

ENT 385 - Technology Entrepreneurship (3 hours)
This course focuses on fostering the analytical and conceptual skills required to develop and test the feasibility of technology-based product-focused business concepts. The course will expose the student to issues that a product-focused company would face when attempting to launch a new venture. Prerequisite: Junior Standing

ENT 386 - Social Entrepreneurship (3 hours)
This course is designed to give students some of the tools and knowledge necessary for understanding, launching and managing a social venture (not for profit or for profit). Social entrepreneurship combines the passion of a social mission with the techniques of the discipline of business. The social entrepreneur applies practical solutions to societal problems. The result may be a new product, new service, or new approach to a social problem. Prerequisite: Junior Standing

ENT 389 - Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-3 hours)
Conceptual treatment of topics important to entrepreneurship. Topics stated in current Schedule of Classes. 1-3 hours, may be repeated up to 6 hours under different titles/topics. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Stated in current Schedule of Classes.

ENT 482 - The Entrepreneurial Experience (3 hours)
This entrepreneurship course is for students who have one or more ideas for starting a business (or nonprofit). The idea could be a retail shop or a biotech product, whatever the students decide. The course is heavily focused on actually creating an enterprise, ideally up to selling products or services. It is also possible to work on an existing venture concept and contribute to its actual development. This "hands on" course will enable students to launch ventures after the course concludes, with mentoring and assistance from the Turner Center. Prerequisite: ENT 382 or ENT 381 or consent of instructor.

ENT 488 - Internship in Entrepreneurship (1-3 hours)
Supervised experience with an approved new or emerging firm or with an agency providing assistance to emerging high-technology firms. Application of entrepreneurship skills. Written application required (available from internship director). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing; entrepreneurship major; 2.5 overall GPA; at least one entrepreneurship-related course

ENT 499 - Independent Study in Entrepreneurship (1-3 hours)
Studies undertaken by academically qualified students under the guidance of a faculty member, with the approval of the chair of the Department of Entrepreneurship, Technology, and Law. May be repeated up to 6 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and stated in the Schedule of Classes.

ENT 660 - Additional Readings in Entrepreneurship (1-6 hours)
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. 1-3 hours, may be repeated up to 6 hours under different titles/topics. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy; consent of instructor and director of graduate programs.

ENT 682 - Entrepreneurship (3 hours)
This course is for MBA students who wish to explore launching a venture of their own or immersing themselves in another actual venture. Beyond the readings, a variety of exercises, live cases and other learning opportunities will enable participants to partially customize the course content to fit their needs and interests. Several specialists and entrepreneurs will serve as distinguished guest entrepreneurs for certain sessions. This is an applied, experiential course that allows for the application of knowledge from other MBA courses. A primary focus will be on conducting a venture feasibility or other project.

ENT 689 - Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-6 hours)
Conceptual treatment of topics important to entrepreneurship. Topics stated in current Schedule of Classes. 1-3 hours, may be repeated up to 6 hours under different titles/topics. Prerequisite: Stated in current Schedule of Classes.

MIS 173 - Information Systems and Business Applications (3 hours)
Application of spreadsheet software to solve business problems. Use of linking functionality between varied applications to create integrated presentations. Brief introduction to the data analysis functions of spreadsheet software and specialized statistical analysis software. Business use of information systems in organizations; electronic commerce and the Internet. The impact of information systems on organizations; system development; ethical and legal issues; data and knowledge management; information security. Prerequisite: business major or minor or consent of department chair

MIS 175 - Introduction to Developing Business Applications (3 hours)
Provides an introduction to object-oriented computer programming using VisualBasic.NET. Demonstrates the advantages of using a programming environment to efficiently develop computer programs. Focuses on developing logical approaches to problem solving and implementing programmed solutions to those problems.

MIS 272 - Management Applications of Personal Computers (3 hours)
Survey of computer applications in business, personal computers, and business information systems. Emphasis on personal computer applications from the perspective of the individual user. Intermediate-level software packages. Prerequisite: MIS 173 or consent of department chair.

MIS 275 - Business Applications Using Visual Basic (3 hours)
Object oriented business application development using Visual Basic. Emphasis on object classes, events and properties, and data structures, controls, and objects. Prerequisite: MIS 175.

MIS 276 - Developing Information Systems for E-Commerce (3 hours)
Provides an introduction to developing e-commerce solutions and their components using various tools. Also explores the business models available for implementing these solutions within and between organizations. It focuses on the application of networked information technologies to implement a rich variety of business applications.

MIS 289 - Topics in Management Information Systems (1-3 hours)
Business technology topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic and prerequisite stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: Stated in current Schedule of Classes

MIS 373 - Business Data Communications (3 hours)
Study of the theories, design and technologies utilized in modern business data communications networks. Study of the functionality, performance and management of multiple network designs. Prerequisite: MIS 173 and 42 hours.

MIS 374 - Database Management and Administration (3 hours)
Investigation and application of advanced database concepts: administration, technology, and selection and acquisition of database management systems. In-depth business practicum in data modeling and system development in a database environment. Overview of future trends in data management. Prerequisite: MIS 272 and 42 hours.

MIS 375 - Business Systems Analysis and Design (3 hours)
Information systems in business applications. Emphasis on relationship of information systems planning to overall business goals, policies, plans, management style, and industry condition; analysis, design, and implementation of information systems. Overview of future trends in data management. Prerequisite: MIS 272 and junior standing.

MIS 378 - Human-Computer Interaction and Usability Testing (3 hours)
Provides an introduction to the theory of human factors and process of usability testing. Explores current theory of human factors and human-computer interaction and how they should be applied to designing business systems. Emphasis placed on the scientific approach to systems testing to ensure systems meet usability standards and on the statistical benchmarking these tests provide. This is a non-technical course designed for those interested in managing the development of technical products and evaluating the usability of existing products and processes.

MIS 379 - Information Systems Security (3 hours)
An introduction to the various technical and administrative aspects of information security and assurance. Provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

MIS 389 - Advanced Topics in Management Information System (1-3 hours)
Advanced business technology topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic and prerequisite stated in current Schedule of Classes. Topic and prerequisite stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six (6) hours credit. Prerequisite: Stated in current Schedule of Classes

MIS 478 - Implementing Business Computer Systems (3 hours)
Development of a business computer system application with the life cycle methodology. Specific concepts and skills of project management. Team projects. Prerequisite: MIS 375.

MIS 479 - Topics in Management Information Systems (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic and prerequisite stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: stated in current schedule of classes

MIS 499 - Independent Studies in Management Information Systems (1-3 hours)
Studies undertaken by academically qualified students under the guidance of a faculty member, with the approval of the chair of the Department of Entrepreneurship, Technology, and Law. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: Stated in current Schedule of Classes

MIS 613 - Advanced Algorithms for Business (3 hours)
Study of advance algorithms focusing on complex data structures and nonlinear systems using chaos and fractal theory for quantitative analysis. Course implements graphical geometry to represent recursion, termination of solution progress, limits, self-similarity and moving target analysis as it applies to business based financial approximations. This course is tailored to the needs of Master of Science in Quantitative Finance (MSQF) and Master of Business Administration (MBA) students. Various programming environments will be used to program solutions. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor or MIS 275 or CIS 275.

MIS 614 - Topics in Advanced Business Technology (3 hours)
Study of advanced topics in business technology. Topics may vary each time course is offered. Topics will be stated in current schedule of classes. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor\x09\x09

MIS 658 - Topics in Management Information Systems (1-6 hours)
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time the course is offered. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six (6) hours credit. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: Stated in current Schedule of Classes

MIS 660 - Readings in Management Information Systems (1-6 hours)
Individual readings in Management Information Systems for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy; consent of instructor and director of graduate programs

MIS 671 - Productivity Software for Managers (3 hours)
The use of packaged software to improve personal productivity in the business environment: spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, database retrieval, statistics, word processing, and electronic mail. Problem-solving laboratory exercises using the different software packages.

MIS 672 - Information Systems Management (2 hours)
Knowledge and application of information-related resources from a management perspective: identifying information needs, strategic uses of information systems, emerging information technologies, managing information resources effectively.

MIS 673 - Data Communications for Managers (3 hours)
Data communications for supporting management decision making and group coordination: communication technologies, idea generation and group collaboration, data and video conferencing, emerging technologies for communication and coordination. Prerequisite: MIS 672 or consent of director of graduate programs.

MIS 675 - Managing Systems Development (3 hours)
Tools and techniques needed to manage the development of information systems. Systems analysis techniques, rapid application development, data modeling, data management and administration, project management tools and techniques. Prerequisite: MIS 672 or consent of director of graduate programs.

MIS 676 - Electronic Commerce (3 hours)
Introduction to electronic commerce (EC). Managerial and organizational issues surrounding EC. History of Internet, emerging technologies for EC, electronic data interchange, digital libraries, data warehouses, interactive advertising and marketing, kiosk systems. Relation of EC to organizational strategy. Prerequisite: MIS 672 or consent of director of graduate programs.

M L 250 - Interpersonal Effectiveness in Organizations (2 hours)
Individual and group theories of behavior within organizations. Applying methods of effective interpersonal interactions, increasing self-awareness (through topics including perception, personality, attitudes, values and the effects of stress) in order to better inform an understanding of others. Various interpersonal competencies including motivating others, team dynamics including diversity, problem-solving, decision-making and conflict management, and communicating expectations and feedback. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Students who have already completed BUS 210 will not receive credit for this course.

M L 300 - Environments of Organizations (2 hours)
Prepares students to be productive managers by increasing their understanding of the organization context. Provides an overview of the environments in which firms operate. Give students a fundamental understanding of the various industries in which firms function and the key issues within those environments that affect the practice of management (including adapting to global environments, sustainability, and ethics) providing students with the conceptual frameworks and tools that will enable them to analyze and understand the managerial context. Students discuss and perform analysis and assessment of the environments of organizations.

M L 315 - Risk and Insurance (3 hours)
Insurance aspects of risk. Nature of risk assessment and control and financing activities in organizations. Firm risk policy issues. Cross-listed as ASB 315. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

M L 350 - Managing for Results in Organizations (2 hours)
Planning, organizing and control processes as practices of management. Introduction of management roles, functions, and skills, and evolution of management thought. Discussion of general and task environment and organizational stakeholders. Analysis of planning, strategy, and decision-making frameworks. Foundations of organizational structure and design, human capital, and managerial control models including feedback systems. Application of concepts to contemporary examples. Prerequisite: Junior standing or declared first major and 42 credit hours. Students who have already completed BMA 352 will not receive credit for this course.

M L 353 - Operations Management in Organizations (3 hours)
Survey of issues and methods related to designing, implementing, and controlling the production and delivery of goods and services. Topics include waiting line management, forecasting, project management, JIT and lean operations, supply chain management, Six Sigma quality management, and strategic importance of operations management. Prerequisite: Q M 263; M L 350

M L 354 - Maximizing Effectiveness in Organizations (2 hours)
Organizational effectiveness theories and techniques. Analysis and data gathering tools including employee survey research, process mapping, organizational culture assessment, and systems thinking. Action planning and implementation topics including organizational adaptability, leadership coaching, and organizational change management. Introduction to consultative skills. Prerequisite: M L 250, M L 350

M L 356 - Human Capital in Organizations (3 hours)
A survey course considering the strategic management of firm's human capital in the context of the human resource management function. Covers the legal, strategic, and regulatory facets of human resource management along with the topics of staffing, training, compensation management, and labor relations. Experiential exercises, case studies, and class presentations will be used to illustrate the effective and efficient management of a firm's human capital through human resource management. Prerequisite: M L 350

M L 357 - Leading Organizations (2 hours)
Theory and practice of organizational leadership skills. Exposure to major leadership theories and advanced interpersonal techniques. Strengths-based leadership, networking, negotiation, decision-making, organizational direction setting, and communicating with influence and authority. Applied projects and in-class experiences. Prerequisite: M L 250

M L 358 - Managerial Decision Making (3 hours)
Descriptive and prescriptive approaches; formal and informal methods. Emphasis on subjective judgments and choices. Prerequisite: ML 350 or 6 hours psychology and/or sociology; a 3-credit-hour course in statistics.

M L 394 - Supply Chain Tools and Techniques (3 hours)
Prepares students for work as supply chain professionals by giving them familiarity with the dominant terminology, tools, and approaches used in supply chain management. Cross-listed with MTG 394. Prerequisite: MTG 315, M L 353

M L 450 - Competitive Strategy (3 hours)
Concepts, principles, and techniques of developing strategy in competitive markets. Case studies for analysis of firms' strategic maneuvering. Simulation exercises on strategic decision making in competitive market structures. Prerequisite: M L 350; FIN 322; MTG 315.

M L 452 - Strategic Management in Organizations (4 hours)
Integrative capstone includes the strategic-planning process, environmental analysis, developing strategy, strategic decision making, and strategy execution. Participation in a Senior Consulting Project, where students form cross-functional teams and apply knowledge to address the organizational needs of local business owners and organizational executives. Prerequisite: FIN 322; M L 350; MTG 315; senior standing.

M L 456 - Compensation Management (3 hours)
Advanced course considering the strategic management of a firm's human capital through the human resource management function of compensation management. Compensation management topics of internal alignment, external competitiveness, pay for performance, benefits management, and pay system administration will be considered. Includes an integrative simulation exercise to illustrate the effective and efficient management of a firm's human capital through compensation management. Prerequisite: M L 356

M L 457 - Advanced Human Capital Management (3 hours)
Advanced consideration of the management of firm's human capital in the context of activities associated with the human resources function. The course will emphasize the strategic, theoretical, technical, and legal aspects of staffing, training, and compensation management. Experiential exercises, case studies, and class presentations will be used to develop an advanced understanding of the use of human resource management to effectively and efficiently manage a firm's human capital. Prerequisite: M L 356

M L 459 - Topics in Management (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic and prerequisite stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six hours credit.

M L 497 - Research in Organizations (1-3 hours)
Participation in academic research by academically qualified students under the guidance of a faculty member, with the approval of the chair of the Department of Management and Leadership. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing. Management and Leadership majors only.

M L 498 - Independent Studies (1-3 hours)
Studies undertaken by academically qualified students under the guidance of a faculty member, with the approval of the chair of the Department of Management and Leadership. Management and Leadership majors only. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing.

M L 499 - Independent Studies (1-3 hours)
Studies undertaken by academically qualified students under the guidance of a faculty member, with the approval of the chair of the Department of Business Management and Administration. Management and Leadership majors only. Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing.

M L 553 - Operations Management (2 hours)
Survey of issues and decision-making techniques related to the operations of an organization. Quality management, project management, inventory management, waiting line analysis, production scheduling, job design, and facility layout. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA elective or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: Consent of graduate program director.

M L 602 - Organizational Behavior (3 hours)
Analysis of individual and group behavior in the organizational environment. Motivation, leadership, communication, conflict, change, decision-making, and organizational theory, demonstrated through classroom experiences. Prerequisite: M L 350

M L 608 - Open Book Management (3 hours)
Effective management practice under conditions of timely communication of frequently updated operational and financial data for problem solving by organization members. Emphasis on effective coordination of organization members'\x1a tasks with shared goals and shared knowledge of how activities relate to these goals. Course considers Open Book Management implications for job descriptions, performance measurement, selection and training, supervision, handling conflict, relationships with suppliers, innovation, and learning from failure.

M L 615 - Interpersonal Relations (3 hours)
Foundations of interpersonal behavior, emphasizing the development and application of the interpersonal skills critical for managerial success. Foster self-understanding and self-awareness through a variety of assessment instruments.

M L 620 - Management Theory (3 hours)
Planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling operations through managerial decision making. Emerging issues and trends; integration of principles and concepts with contemporary concerns. Prerequisite: QM 263 or QM 502.

M L 628 - Business Policy and Strategy Formulation (3 hours)
Strategies in response to conditions such as competition and future development. Must be taken in last semester of program.

M L 630 - Management in Healthcare Organizations (3 hours)
Interdisciplinary approach to understanding management in healthcare organizations. Emphasis on the complex roles of healthcare workers and the behavioral processes of leadership, communication, motivation, group dynamics, conflict, change, organizational development. The class also considers diversity, social responsibility, and ethics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; As specified in the Schedule of Classes

M L 655 - Organizational Change (1 hour)
The need for change and building a readiness for organizational change. Models for implementing change that build employee support and commitment. Practical approaches and unique health care related situations of seminar participants are discussed.

M L 657 - Executive Development (3 hours)
Theory and research of development stages of executive careers. The impact of the organization on the executive personality; forces influencing the development of executive skills and abilities; studies of antecedents of executive role performance; and the role of training programs in executive development.

M L 658 - Topics in Business Administration (3 hours)
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time the course is offered. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hours. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes.

M L 659 - Topics in Management (3 hours)
Management-related topics presented in modules or seminars. Topics may vary each time the course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credit hours.

M L 660 - Readings in Business Administration (1-3 hours)
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Repeatable to a maximum of 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy; consent of instructor and director of graduate programs.