Industrial Engineering

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering and Technology

The baccalaureate programs in industrial engineering and manufacturing engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.  The baccalaureate program in manufacturing engineering technology is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

FACULTY Emeritus Professor Sverdlin; Professors Chen (chair), Emanuel, Krishnamoorthi, Kroll, Lin, Shareef, Tayyari; Associate Professor Saboury; Assistant Professors Li, Melton, Yoo.

The department offers three baccalaureate degree programs:

The department offers three minors:

The department also offers master’s degrees in industrial engineering (M.S.I.E.) and manufacturing engineering (M.S.MF.E.). See the Graduate Catalog for information about these programs.

Programmatic Distinctions

In choosing a career option, the student should be aware of the respective functions of the engineer and engineering technologist. Generally, the engineer conceives, designs, and advances the development of products and systems. On the other hand, the engineering technologist implements, maintains, and tests products and systems. The engineer creates new technologies while the engineering technologist applies existing technologies. The manufacturing engineering technology program is more oriented towards hands-on applications than engineering degree programs, and they are not as theoretical. In laboratories, students apply theoretical information to solve practical problems.

Industrial engineers determine the most effective ways to use the production factors (people, machines, materials, information, and energy) to make a product or provide a service. They are concerned primarily with increasing productivity through the management of people, methods of business organization, and technology. They develop management control systems to aid in financial planning and cost analysis, and they design production planning and control systems to coordinate activities to meet the demand and ensure product quality. They also design or improve systems for the physical distribution of goods and services and determine the most efficient plant locations. Industrial engineers develop wage and salary administration systems and job evaluation programs. Many industrial engineers move into management positions because the work is closely related to the work of managers. Manufacturing engineers apply knowledge of materials and engineering theory and methods to design, integrate, and improve manufacturing systems and processes. They may work with designers to refine product designs to increase productibility and decrease costs.

The engineering student’s selection of humanities and social science courses provide a broad education consistent with the objectives of the engineering profession. Courses should be selected to provide both breadth and depth and not be limited to unrelated introductory courses. This objective can be met by taking two courses in the same department with at least one being at the 300 level or above. Students minoring in business are permitted to use ECO 100/221 and ECO 222 to meet this requirement.

The department works closely with industry and has an outstanding Industrial Advisory Council (IAC) consisting of distinguished members from industry, government, and education.

Student Organizations

Student chapters of the American Society for Materials (ASM), American Society for Quality (ASQ), Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), American Foundrymen’s Society (AFS), and Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) are sponsored by the department to support and encourage the professional development of the students. The department is also a strong supporter of the student chapter of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE).

Honor societies for industrial engineering students (Alpha Pi Mu) and for manufacturing students (Beta Tau Epsilon) are also represented.

Industrial Engineering (BSIE)

Program Educational Objectives

Within five years into their careers, the graduates from the Industrial Engineering Program at Bradley University will have successful careers based on:

  • Demonstrated ability to recognize business and technical engineering problems and implement effective solutions to such.
  • Demonstrated ability to effectively lead cross-functional multi-disciplinary diverse teams in the design, implementation, and/or improvement of processes and systems both regionally and globally.
  • Demonstrated professional development through continuous learning opportunities such as varied work assignments, promotions, graduate schools, and/or professional associations.
  • Demonstrated involvement in service activities that benefit the profession or the community.

Student Outcomes

Industrial Engineering graduates will have:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and science to mathematical modeling and to problems related to systems that produce products and services;
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze data and interpret experimental results;
  3. an ability to design or select components or processes of a production or service system to obtain desired output based on performance, economic, and productivity criteria;
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams, an understanding of the concurrent approach to process and product development, and an ability to perform project management;
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and find optimal solutions to system problems, while considering physical and economic constraints as well as safety and ergonomics issues;
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities of an industrial engineer;
  7. an ability to utilize modern tools and techniques to effectively communicate technical requirements and functionality in oral, written, and graphical forms;
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context;
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, continuous improvement projects and life-long learning;
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues facing engineers;
  11. an ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for industrial engineering practice, utilizing supporting technologies or techniques including economic measurement, information systems design, occupational ergonomics, human behavior, systems planning, and total quality management.

Industrial Engineering Major

Industrial engineers design, develop, test, and evaluate integrated systems for managing production processes including human work factors, inventory control, logistics and material flow, quality control, cost analysis, and production coordination. The industrial engineer applies engineering methods to a variety of activities in the design, production, and distribution of goods and services; works in organizations including manufacturing, hospitals, commerce, and government agencies; and operates in such specific professional areas as human work measurement, management systems design, human factors engineering, applied statistics, operations research, reliability and quality control, and systems engineering. Industrial engineering is the combination of engineering and business administration.

The curriculum provides a sound basis in the fundamentals of engineering, physical and behavioral sciences, and theoretical and applied mathematics. The emphasis on problem solving of both structured and unstructured types prepares the student for a wide variety of IME employment opportunities as well as for graduate training in IME, or such associated professions as law or business. This diversity of career opportunities is a major reason that students choose IME. The student is encouraged to select a minor in a supporting area such as business, quality engineering, computer science, manufacturing, math, psychology, or economics. Some minors will require additional hours beyond BSIE requirements.

Most faculty teaching in the IME program have had full-time industrial experience. The emphasis of the department is directed towards real-world problems. During the senior year, students work under faculty supervision on actual problems that exist in the community in manufacturing organizations and service organizations such as hospitals, government agencies, air transport companies, court systems, and utility companies.

To meet the ABET requirements for humanities and social sciences, some general education courses must be selected according to the IE approved list. They may be taken in any sequence and not necessarily in the semester indicated. Other University general education requirements are satisfied by specific courses required above.

Students have the option to complete the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering program with or without declaring an area of concentration. The courses listed in the following curricular schedule must be completed to meet degree requirements in industrial engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering.

Freshman Year

First Semester
IME 101 Intro. to Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering - 1 hr.
IME 103 Computer Aided Graphics - 2 hrs.
MTH 121 Calculus I - 4 hrs.
CHM 110 General Chemistry I - 3 hrs.
CHM 111 General Chemistry I Lab - 1 hr.
ENG 101 English Composition - 3 hrs.
Gen Ed. – Social Forces Econ. 100/121 - 3 hrs.
17 hrs.

Second Semester
IME 110 Intro. to Computers and Computational Analysis - 3 hrs.
MTH 122 Calculus II - 4 hrs.
PHY 110 University Physics - 4 hrs.
COM 103 The Oral Communication Process - 3 hrs.
Gen. Ed – Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
17 hrs.

Sophomore Year

First Semester
IME 301 Engineering Economy I - 3 hrs.
IME 341 Intro. to Manufacturing Processes - 3 hrs.
MTH 223 Calculus III - 4 hrs.
CE 150 Mechanics I - 3 hrs.
Gen Ed – Human Values - 3
16 hrs.

Second Semester
IME 311 Intro to Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
IME 386 Industrial & Managerial Engineering - 3 hrs.
PHY 201 University Physics II - 4 hrs.
CE 270 Mechanics of Materials - 3 hrs.
MTH 207 Elementary Linear Algebra or MTH 224 Differential Equations - 3
16 hrs.

Junior Year

First Semester
IME 305 Engineering Economy II - 2 hrs.
IME 312 Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
IME 313 Operations Research I - 3 hrs.
IME 331 Fundamentals of Materials Science - 3 hrs.
IME 361 Introduction to Simulation and Expert Systems - 2 hrs.
Gen. Ed. Fine Arts - 3
16 hrs.

Second Semester
IME 466 Facilities Planning - 3 hrs.
IE Elective** - 3 hrs.
IE Elective** - 3 hrs.
Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
Gen. Ed. Non-Western Civilization - 3
15 hrs.

Senior Year
First Semester
IME 422 Manufacturing Quality Control - 3 hrs.
IME 485 Occupational Ergonomics - 3 hrs.
IE Elective* - 3 hrs.
Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
15 hrs.

Second Semester
IE Elective* - 3 hrs.
IME 499 Senior Design Project - 4 hrs.
ENG 305 Technical Writing - 3 hrs.
Gen. Ed. Social Forces - 3 hrs.
13 hrs.

Total hours - 125

† All courses with number 301 or above in the college of Engineering & Technology are approved as technical electives for this concentration.  A list of additional technical electives is available in the department office.

* IE Elective courses include:
IME 314 Operations Research II
IME 461 Advanced Simulation
IME 466 Facilities Planning
IME 468 Expert Systems
IME 483 Productions Planning & Control
IME 486 Logistics & Supply Chain Systems
IME 412 Design and Analysis of Experiments
IME 587 Occupational Safety and Health

 

Engineering Management Concentration (B.S.I.E.)

The Engineering Management concentration is most appropriate for technically focused individuals who desire to achieve management-level positions in engineering environments. This concentration focuses on management of technology and intellectual property; research and development; engineering and technical projects; people, resources and organizations; quality; and team-based projects.

The courses listed in the following curricular schedule must be completed to meet degree requirements in industrial engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering with an Engineering Management Concentration. Students declaring this concentration must declare and complete the Management minor in the Foster College of Business Administration.

Concentration core courses for Engineering Management are:

  • BMA 352 Managing in Organizations - 3 hrs.
  • BMA 356 Human Resource Management - 3 hrs.
  • BMA 357 Leadership and Interpersonal Behavior - 3 hrs.
  • Approved Management Minor Elective (300 or 400-level) - 6 hrs.

Freshman Year

First Semester

  • IME 101 Intro. to Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering – 1 hr.
  • IME 103 Computer Aided Graphics - 2 hrs.
  • MTH 121 Calculus I - 4 hrs.
  • CHM 110 General Chemistry I - 3 hrs.
  • CHM 111 General Chemistry I Lab – 1 hr.
  • ENG 101 English Composition - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed. – Social Forces Econ. 100/121 - 3 hrs.
    17 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 110 Intro. to Computers and Computational Analysis - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 122 Calculus II - 4 hrs.
  • PHY 110 University Physics - 4 hrs.
  • COM 103 The Oral Communication Process - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed – Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    17 hrs.

Sophomore Year

First Semester

  • IME 301 Engineering Economy I - 3 hrs.
  • IME 341 Intro. to Manufacturing Processes - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 223 Calculus III - 4 hrs.
  • CE 150 Mechanics I - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed – Human Values - 3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 311 Intro to Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
  • IME 386 Industrial & Managerial Engineering - 3 hrs.
  • PHY 201 University Physics II - 4 hrs.
  • CE 270 Mechanics of Materials - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 207 Elementary Linear Algebra or MATH 224 Differential Equations - 3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Junior Year

First Semester

  • IME 305 Engineering Economy II - 2 hrs.
  • IME 312 Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
  • IME 313 Operations Research I - 3 hrs.
  • IME 331 Fundamentals of Materials Science - 3 hrs.
  • IME 361 Introduction to Simulation and Expert Systems - 2 hrs.
  • BMA 352 Managing in Organizations - 3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 466 Facilities Planning - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Fine Arts - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Non-Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
  • Approved Management Minor Elective (300 or 400-level) - 3 hrs.
  • BMA 356 Human Resource Management - 3 hrs.
    15 hrs.

Senior Year

First Semester

  • IME 422 Manufacturing Quality Control - 3 hrs.
  • IME 485 Occupational Ergonomics - 3 hrs.
  • BMA 357 Leadership and Interpersonal Behavior - 3 hrs.
  • Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
  • Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
    15 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 499 Senior Design Project – 4 hrs.
  • ENG 305 Technical Writing – 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Social Forces – 3 hrs.
  • Approved Management Elective (300 or 400-level) – 3 hrs.
    13 hrs.

    Total hours: 125

† All courses with number 301 or above in the college of Engineering and Technology are approved as technical electives for this concentration.  A list of additional technical electives is available in the department office.

Logistics & Supply Chain Engineering Concentration (B.S.I.E.)

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (BSIE) program with the Logistics & Supply Chain Engineering concentration emphasizes courses that will improve the student’s analytical skills, particularly as they pertain to material procurement and distribution network optimization within complex supply chain systems.

Concentration core courses for Logistics & Supply Chain Engineering are:

  • IME 461 Simulation of Human-Machine Systems - 3 hrs.
  • IME 481 Lean Production Systems - 3 hrs.
  • IME 483 Production Planning and Control - 3 hrs.
  • IME 486 Logistics & Supply Chain Systems - 3 hrs.

The courses listed in the following curricular schedule must be completed to meet degree requirements in industrial engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering with a Logistics & Supply Chain Engineering concentration.

Freshman Year

First Semester

  • IME 101 Intro. to Industrial and Manufacturing Eng. - 1 hr.
  • IME 103 Computer Aided Graphics - 2 hrs.
  • MTH 121 Calculus I - 4 hrs.
  • CHM 110 General Chemistry I - 3 hrs.
  • CHM 111 General Chemistry I Lab - 1 hr.
  • ENG 101 English Composition - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed. – Social Forces Econ. 100/221 - 3 hrs.
    17 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 110 Intro. to Computers and Computational Analysis - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 122 Calculus II - 4 hrs.
  • PHY 110 University Physics - 4 hrs.
  • COM 103 The Oral Communication Process - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed – Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    17 hrs.

Sophomore Year

First Semester

  • IME 301 Engineering Economy I - 3 hrs.
  • IME 341 Intro. to Manufacturing Processes - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 223 Calculus III - 4 hrs.
  • CE 150 Mechanics I - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed – Human Values - 3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 311 Intro. to Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
  • IME 386 Industrial & Managerial Engineering - 3 hrs.
  • PHY 201 University Physics II - 4 hrs.
  • CE 270   Mechanics of Materials - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 207 Elementary Linear Algebra or MTH 224 Differential Equations - 3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Junior Year

First Semester

  • IME 305 Engineering Economy II - 2 hrs.
  • IME 312 Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
  • IME 313 Operations Research I - 3 hrs.
  • IME 331 Fundamentals of Materials Science - 3 hrs.
  • IME 361 Introduction to Simulation and Expert Systems - 2 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Fine Arts - 3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 466 Facilities Planning - 3 hrs.
  • IME 483 Production Planning and Control –3 hrs.
  • **Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
  • **Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Non-Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    15 hrs.

Senior Year

First Semester

  • IME 422 Manufacturing Quality Control  - 3 hrs.
  • IME 481 Lean Production Systems - 3 hrs.
  • IME 485 Occupational Ergonomics - 3 hrs.
  • **Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
  • IME 461 Simulation of Human-Machine Systems - 3 hrs.
    15 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 499 Senior Design Project - 4 hrs.
  • ENG 305 Technical Writing - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Social Forces - 3 hrs.
  • IME 486 Logistics & Supply Chain Systems - 3 hrs.
    13 hrs.

    Total
    125

**All courses with number 301 or above in the college of Engineering & Technology are approved as technical elective courses for this concentration.  A list of additional technical electives is available in the department office.

Systems Engineering Concentration (B.S.I.E.)

The Systems Engineering concentration prepares students to meet the increasing need from industry for engineers who go beyond the expertise in a particular engineering discipline. In this concentration, students develop skills to integrate system components for ensuring total system operability reaching optimum productivity. Students will also develop skills to design or improve systems for the physical distribution of goods and services and determine the most efficient plant locations.

Concentration core courses for Systems Engineering are:

  • IME 314 Operations Research II - 3 hrs.
  • IME 468 Expert Systems - 3 hrs.
  • IME 483 Productions Planning & Control - 3 hrs.
  • PSY 310 Industrial & Organization Psychology - 3 hrs.

The courses listed in the following curricular schedule must be completed to meet degree requirements in industrial engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering with a Systems Engineering Concentration.

Freshman Year

First Semester

  • IME 101 Intro. to Industrial and Manufacturing Eng. - 1 hr.
  • IME 103 Computer Aided Graphics - 2 hrs.
  • MTH 121 Calculus I - 4 hrs.
  • CHM 110 General Chemistry I - 3 hrs.
  • CHM 111 General Chemistry I Lab - 1 hr.
  • ENG 101 English Composition - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed. – Social Forces Econ. 100/121 - 3 hrs.
    17 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 110 Intro. to Computers and Computational Analysis - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 122 Calculus II - 4 hrs.
  • PHY 110 University Physics - 4 hrs.
  • COM 103 The Oral Communication Process - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed – Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    17
    hrs.

Sophomore Year

First Semester

  • IME 301 Engineering Economy I - 3 hrs.
  • IME 341 Intro. to Manufacturing Processes - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 223 Calculus III - 4 hrs.
  • CE 150 Mechanics I - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed – Human Values - 3 hrs.
    16
    hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 311 Intro to Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
  • IME 386 Industrial & Managerial Engineering - 3 hrs.
  • PHY 201 University Physics II - 4 hrs.
  • CE 270 Mechanics of Materials - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 207 Elementary Linear Algebra or MTH 224 Differential Equations - 3 hrs.
    16
    hrs.

Junior Year

First Semester

  • IME 305 Engineering Economy II - 2 hrs.
  • IME 312 Engineering Statistical Methods - 3 hrs.
  • IME 313 Operations Research I - 3 hrs.
  • IME 331 Fundamentals of Materials Science - 3 hrs.
  • IME 361 Introduction to Simulation and Expert Systems - 2 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Fine Arts -  3 hrs.
    16 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 314 Operations Research II - 3 hrs.
  • IME 466 Facilities Planning - 3 hrs.
  • **Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Non-Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
  • PSY 310 Industrial & Organization Psychology - 3 hrs.
    15 hrs.

Senior Year
First Semester

  • IME 422 Manufacturing Quality Control  - 3 hrs.
  • IME 485 Occupational Ergonomics - 3 hrs.
  • IME 468 Expert Systems - 3 hrs.
  • **Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
  • **Approved Technical Elective - 3 hrs.
    15 hrs.

Second Semester

  • IME 483 Productions Planning & Control - 3 hrs.
  • IME 499 Senior Design Project - 4 hrs.
  • ENG 305 Technical Writing - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. Social Forces - 3 hrs.
    13 hrs.


    Total
    125 hours

** All courses with number 301 or above in the college of Engineering & Technology are approved as technical electives for this concentration. A list of additional technical electives is available in the department office.

BSIE Combined with MBA Program

Undergraduate students in the industrial engineering program may combine their studies and earn an MBA degree in five and one-half years or fewer. Students may include all of the prerequisites for the MBA program as part of their required 127 undergraduate semester hours. Careful scheduling is required and should be coordinated with the student’s undergraduate advisor and director of graduate programs.

Students electing this option must be fully admitted before registering for graduate-level courses and have the written approval of the director of graduate programs. Students should contact the director of graduate programs during their sophomore year for particular information.